Utah Passes Constitutional Tender Act

cross-posted from the Utah Tenth Amendment Center

Today, the Utah Senate passed HB317, a bill which will legalize gold and silver as tender within the state of Utah and exempt the exchange (purchase) of such specie from sales and capital gains taxes. Having already passed the House, the bill will now be sent to Governor Herbert to be signed into law, should he so decide.

This type of bill is one that is becoming increasingly popular throughout the country, with multiple states introducing and considering such legislation. Though Utah is now the first state to have a legislature approve of the idea, the sustained momentum of getting other states to review the proposal demonstrates the resiliency of the campaign for sound money. With the U.S. Dollar plummeting in value, this is an issue that will become more popular as time goes on.

As the author of the bill noted in a Fox News article on the subject, this bill will allow Utahns to better prepare for financial turmoil ahead, more easily diversifying into currency with a long history of stability.

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New England Nullification Tradition Marches On

Though many living in New England today might be loathe to admit it, there is a long history of nullification being used in the region to defy unconstitutional federal edicts. This week, the town of Sedgwick, Maine voted to carry on that proud tradition by nullifying certain federal agricultural regulations.

They did so through what might be the most legitimate form of democratic expression left in America: the New England town meeting. (Which have been held in the Sedgwick town hall since 1794.)

According to one report, the residents of Sedgwick voted to enact a law that not only permits

“Sedgwick citizens…to produce, process, sell, purchase, and consume local foods of their choosing,”

but declares that

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Abrupt end to Kentucky regular session kills sovereignty bills

The 2011 regular session of the Kentucky State Legislature came to an abrupt end Wednesday, killing any hope of passing one of the several state sovereignty bills still pending.

Senate President David Williams (R-Burkesville) ended the session 12 days early, a political move related to the ongoing budget battle and deadlock over how to resolve Medicare shortfalls.

Gov. Steve Beshear immediately called for a special session to begin next week. But lawmakers can only take up legislation included in the governor’s call during special session, and it appears Beshear will limit the session to the passing the budget and raising the high school dropout age, one of his pet issues.

That leaves several state sovereignty bills dead in the water.

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