Missouri’s Senator Nieves standing up for your rights

Brian Nieves, State Senator from Missouri, recently appeared as a guest on Tenther Radio Episode 37. Nieves, who introduced Senate Bill 819  (Prohibits state enforcement of provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012) explained the bill as being, “probably not unlike some of the stuff that’s being filed in other parts of the United States, but basically it just says that this NDAA stuff is not going to work in the state of Missouri. The State of Missouri is going to stand up and say we are a sovereign state, we’re not going to have our constitutional rights violated by this out-of-control Federal Government, and the element of that NDAA act that we found most egregious is just simply not going to be enforced in the state of Missouri.”

As for President Obama signing the NDAA and allowing the Federal Government a huge new power – but then saying that his administration doesn’t have plans to use it – Nieves believes this to be perilous ground for the people of Missouri. “… even if he intends to hold to that, and not detain American citizens – the fact still remains that there is at least the chance that it could happen. And we can’t even allow there to be the chance.”

But despite passage of the Healthcare Freedom Act by vote recently, does Missouri have the backbone to stand up and say no to Washington D.C.? Senator Nieves replied with, “I think the people of Missouri certainly have the backbone to stand up to the Federal Government. Whether or not the Missouri Legislature has the backbone to do that – I’m not as confident in the Legislature as I am in the people of Missouri. And that’s why it’s good we’re getting the word out through these types of resources, so that the people can begin to stand up and demand that our Legislature do the right thing.”

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Arizona anti-NDAA legislation moving closer to full passage

PHOENIX, Ariz. (March 14, 2012) – A bill blocking implementation of indefinite detention provisions in the National Defense Authorization Act and a resolution condemning those kidnapping provisions both passed out of Arizona House committees Wednesday

SCR1011 passed 8-0 out in the House Military Affairs and Public Safety Committee, with one member absent. SCR1011 declares:

That the Members of the Legislature condemn sections 1021 and 1022 of the 2012 NDAA as they purport to repeal posse comitatus and authorize the President of the United States to use the armed forces of the United States to police American citizens, to indefinitely detain persons captured within the United States without charge until the end of hostilities as purportedly authorized by the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force, to subject persons captured within the United States to military tribunals, and to transfer persons captured within the United States to a foreign country or foreign entity.

The resolution still needs to pass out of the rules committee before moving on to a House Caucus for a second reading. If it passed that, it will proceed to the Committee of the Whole for debate and then on to a final vote.

SB1182 would prohibit any agency of the state from providing material support for or from participating in any way with the implementation of sections 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2012, Public Law 112‑81, against any citizen of the United States. It also passed out of the House Military Affairs and Public Safety Committee by a 6-3 vote, keeping it on track for final House approval.

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“Free the American West”: But western lands could trigger revolt

The Hill’s John Feehery asks the important question: Is this election about revolution or restoration? Since April, 2009 when Texas Governor Rick Perry chanted “ . . . states’ rights, states’ rights, states’ rights!!!” at the Alamo, it’s been on people’s minds. Perry, Gingrich, Santorum, Bachmann, Paul have tendencies.

Revolt needs philosophers like Ron Paul, distinguished supporters like Perry, passionate advocates like Sarah Palin, warrior ascetics like Alaska’s Joe Miller and even mad hatters like Glenn Beck. But most a revolt needs casus belli; a singular cause that bonds to purpose. Otherwise, there is no rebellion. There is an issue today that qualifies: Land.

“Whose land is it,” Connor Boyack, Director, Utah Tenth Amendment Center, asks in The Daily Caller? “Has the federal government become so arrogant as to claim ownership of the land over which it has jurisdiction? Put differently, does the United States of America exist to protect and defend the property of each individual living within its borders, or to own and control that property itself? This is not a theoretical question reserved for intellectual banter. It is a real question pondered often, especially by those in western regions where the majority of land is owned and regulated by the federal government. Although the federal government owns less than 10% of almost every eastern state, it owns large swaths of the West: 65% of the land in Utah, 83% of Nevada, 63% of Idaho, 45% of Arizona, 44% of California and similar percentages of the surrounding western states.”

We never consider it back east, but demographics bring it. Slightly more than one hundred years back the western regions were virtually empty, struggling for a purchase under a Comanche moon. Today, those who prioneered there might want to make their own determinations.

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