Detainment of Virginia Marine veteran NOT an NDAA issue

CHESTERFIELD, Va. (Aug. 22, 2012)  – By now, you have likely heard about Brandon Raub, the Marine veteran in Chesterfield, Va. involuntarily committed to a mental hospital for evaluation due to posts he made on Facebook.

FBI and Secret Service agents, along with Chesterfield police, reportedly questioned Raub last week. Police then took him into custody and transported him to Randolph Medical Center in Hopewell. Police, the FBI and the Secret Service all said Raub was not arrested. Chesterfield police issued a statement Monday saying Chesterfield mental health crisis intervention workers recommended that officers take Raub into emergency custody and bring him in for a mental evaluation.

On Monday, Special Justice Walter Douglas Stokes ordered Raub detained for up to 30 days for further psychological evaluation “for statements that are controversial and terrorist in nature,” according to his Rutherford Institute attorney.

Over the last couple of days, I’ve seen numerous posts linking Raub’s detainment with the detention provisions written into the National Defense Authorization Act. While his detainment raises many red flags, it is NOT an NDAA issue.

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Multi-front war against NDAA detention, federal spying on citizens

Push back against indefinite detention without due process written into the National Defense Authorization Act, along with unconstitutional provisions in the Patriot Act and other surveillance oriented federal legislation continues at many different levels.

Here at the Tenth Amendment Center, we focus primarily on state and local solutions, specifically state nullification and local non-cooperation with federal agents acting against people on American soil without due process.

But efforts to repeal indefinite detention and reform the Patriot act also continue in Washington D.C.

The Bill of Rights Defense Committee recently kicked off a grassroots lobbying effort to coincide with Congress’ fall recess. The break offers the perfect opportunity to track down senators and representatives in their home districts and push them to pass civil liberty preserving legislation.

“The constitutional abuses of our national security state are too entrenched for any individual, or any politician, to overcome.  Even though the PATRIOT Act and FISA allow the NSA and FBI to monitor law-abiding people en masse, and the NDAA could allow the military to kidnap and detain activists and journalists without trial, a movement of millions — visible in all the places where we find ourselves — can still restore democracy in America. It’s happening right now all across the country, one city at a time,” BORDC executive director Shahid Buttar said.

The JUSTICE Act counts among the most important bills up for consideration. The act would reform the PATRIOT Act, the FISA Amendments Act and other surveillance authorities to protect Americans’ constitutional rights, while preserving the powers of our government to fight terrorism. According to the BORDC, the JUSTICE Act includes:

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