Obama gives Himself Control of all Communication Systems in the U.S.

President Barack Obama will assume control of U.S. communications should he feel that national security and/or emergency preparedness issues are present as per his executive order of July 6, 2012. There was no consultation with Congress whose constitutional right is to make all law (Art. I, Sec. I). Although not defined, control of all communication presumably meant everything including the Internet as per Section 5 of the Order, although not specifically named. All such was placed under the authority of the White House. (See WhiteHouse.gov July 6, 2012).

Congress had wrestled with the “need” for Internet and cyberspace control for several years even attempting to control the Internet in 2009, but the bills they had originated met with such enormous opposition by the people that the subject was, moved to the back burner. The people clearly did not want government having, what they termed, a “kill switch” on the Internet even during time of national security. Enter the President and his executive order entitled, “Assignment of National Security and Emergency Preparedness Telecommunications Functions.” The Order sounds innocent enough, everybody wants “national security” and “emergency preparedness” but neither phrase is defined. Left undefined it remains the discretion of the office of president alone, whether republican or democrat, to decide what it means. After all, what isn’t “national security?”

Taking law-making power from Congress to influence private communication industries is constitutionally questionable as is the Executive Order itself. It began with the usual statement of authority. “By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America.” Presidential authority would be found in Article II, Sections 2 and 3, or in an amendment to the Constitution enacted thereafter. In this case there is none.

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NDAA Nullification Movement Grows in Michigan

originally published at The New American

The Tenth Amendment Center (TAC) reports that “last week, the Allegan County, Michigan. Board of Commissioners passed a resolution opposing federal kidnapping powers.”

The powers referred to in the TAC article are those included in relevant provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) signed into law on December 31, 2011 by President Barack Obama.

Section 1021 of that act authorizes the president to send the armed forces to indefinitely detain:

a person who was a part of or substantially supported al-Qaeda, the Taliban, or associated forces that are engaged in hostilities against the United States or its coalition partners, including any person who has committed a belligerent act or has directly supported such hostilities in aid of such enemy forces.

Despite an attempt by Congressman Justin Amash (R-Mich.) to remove them, the indefinite detention provisions remain intact in the 2013 version of the bill.

Allegan County’s resolution rejects these pernicious provisions. The resolution reads:

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Anti-Gold Propagandist Steps into the Shredder

I have four things to say.

(1) David Weidner wrote an article critical of the gold standard.

(2) The article contains gems of knowledge like this:

Another problem is that rather than try to improve our currency systems, we keep going back to this 600 B.C. technology that’s a step up from seashells. Gold is pretty, but it’s just a piece of metal. Its uses are limited. It can be dug out of the ground. In other words, it’s really all about human confidence that gold is worth something. And, you know, the earth is flat too….

A big problem is that the gold standard never works. It’s like getting back together with that old girlfriend. Your memories of how good it used to be are tainted by your current pain of loneliness. I get it. The pull is very, very tempting. But haven’t we gone down that road enough already?

(3) Weidner probably never expected this insignificant, phoned-in piece of inanity to be subjected to withering ridicule and refutation, point by point. A refutation so thorough that it even smashes his clumsy efforts at humor (e.g., contrary to popular belief, and as I myself have pointed out, essentially no one believed the earth was flat).

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