Don’t Miss the Debates. The Important Ones!

In an election year such as this, there is a sense in the air that the 2012 elections could be the most important ever.  However, it is not for the reasons the Republican and Democratic establishments like to tell us.  Whether Obama is reelected or Romney successfully makes him a one term President, whether current majorities in the House and Senate remain, one chamber changes parties, or they reverse, the way of DC will remain the same.  Authoritarian, top-down rule will be the name of the game.

So why is this year so important?  Why shouldn’t we miss the debates?  Because I’m not talking about the Presidential debates, even the third party ones that allow some discussion outside the “acceptable spectrum” as Tom Woods has called it.  We also have local debates and elections.  County and municipal elections will be occurring throughout New Jersey, and we need a major change, starting as locally as possible.

I personally will be attending the South Plainfield Borough Council debates.

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Rejecting the Incorporation Doctrine

by Bill Evelyn, State of Georgia Tea Party

NOTE: The Following is a letter that was sent to Jerry Henry, Director of GeorgiaCarry.org

Dear Mr. Henry,

I heard on the news today that you have asked the Supreme Court to make a ruling on the ban of guns in churches in Georiga.  I want to prove to you that this is a very bad way to approach this issue.

The 2nd Amendment restrains the federal government from regulating arms and gives those powers to the state governments via the 10th Amendment.  In Georgia’s Bill of Rights the State government is restrained from prohibiting a person to arm themselves, but with regulations.  In essence the state legislature can outlaw all weapons in Georgia if is deems so, but those legislators would be risking their seats in the next election.  I don’t see this occurring.

The ban of guns in churches was passed by the Georgia legislature 143 years ago during reconstruction and can simply be repealed.  This is the way we should move forward on this matter.

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Drone Warfare and we Wonder Why they Hate us.

On October 6, an unmanned drone flew deep into Israeli territory before it was shot down. The drone, now thought to have been sent by Lebanon, who acquired it from Iran, raises awareness of the sanctity of a nation’s airspace. As the violation of airspace has traditionally been seen as an act of war, Israel sent warplanes over Lebanon the next day. This brings to light how calloused and disrespectful of the air space of other countries we have been where we indiscriminately kill our enemies on their soil.

Drones are now our favored weapon of choice and we unleash them on suspected “terrorists,” without the permission of sovereign countries, throughout the Middle East. Moreover, we assume unto ourselves the right of surveillance of all potential adversaries on their soil. We get away with this because we are the “town bully.” Such would be acts of war if done on stronger countries. According to the Washington Post we have “secret facilities, including two operational hubs on the East Coast, virtual Air Force cockpits in the Southwest and clandestine bases in at least six countries on two continents” (Under Obama, an Emerging Global Apparatus for drone killing, by Greg Miller, Dec. 27, 2011).

The paper reported, “Senior Democrats barely blink at the idea that a president from their party has assembled such a highly efficient machine for the targeted killing of suspected terrorists.” What is worse, “officially, they are not allowed to discuss” this most secretive activity although it is not denied.

President Barack Obama can argue that he did not invent this sophisticated “killing machine.” George W. Bush was the first to use it but he limited its use to Pakistan “where 44 strikes over five years had left about 400 people dead.” This is true, but Obama has amplified its use by at least four times the number of strikes and death and proliferated the death to several additional countries in northern Africa and the Middle East and the above numbers are conservative, the paper revealed.

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