Action Alert: Indiana Senate Republican Siding with Obamacare

In the State of Indiana, Senate Bill 230 (SB0230) would nullify Obamacare within the state and make it a felony to try to implement it in Indiana. A section from this bill reads:

“A person who knowingly or intentionally implements or enforces a federal law, or attempts to implement or enforce a federal law, that is declared void under section 2 of this chapter commits a Class D felony.” (you can learn more about the bill at this link)

SB0230 has strong support in both the Senate and House, and is ready to pass. Except State Senator David Long has made up his mind to side with the Obama administration and is blocking this bill from being even discussed in committee.

The bill sits at the ready, in the Committee on Rules and Legislative Procedure, where State Senator David Long sits as chair. With this power, Long personally gets to decide whether or not the bill gets to be discussed or voted on by the committee, whether there will be public testimony, and the like. DAVID LONG IS PERSONALLY BLOCKING THIS BILL FROM MOVING THROUGH THE PROCESS.

By his lack of action on this extremely important piece of legislation, he’s shown his true colors and is telling the People of Indiana, “I am David Long. As your State Senator, I will not even allow a vote on rejecting Obamacare in this State.”

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SC House Says NO to Exchange

The South Carolina House of Representatives agreed Thursday not to create a state-run health insurance exchange under the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act, AKA Obamacare.

The GOP-controlled House approved the “State Health Care Freedom Act” (H3096) by a vote of 73-40. The measure serves as an endorsement of Republican Gov. Nikki Haley’s refusal to embrace a key part of the federal health-care legislation that President Barack Obama signed in 2010.

“We agree will we will stand by the governor,” said Rep. Joshua Putnam, a Piedmont Republican who was one of the act’s sponsors.

Haley outlined her position on insurance exchanges in a letter to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services director Kathleen Sebelius just days after Obama’s re-election in November.

Arguing that the provisions in the federal health-care law would give South Carolina little flexibility or control, Haley said in her letter that “our state should not and will not set up a state-based” insurance exchange.

Tony Keck, director of the state Department of Health and Human Services, acknowledged that if the state opts not to act, federal officials will create an insurance exchange where South Carolina residents can choose from competing health-coverage plans.

But Keck also noted that 24 other states have decided not to create their own insurance exchanges for reasons similar to those Haley has cited.

“It doesn’t make sense for a state to get involved,” Keck said.

The legislation approved Thursday now will move to the South Carolina Senate.

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