Nullifying Obamacare in Texas

HB 3785, authored by Rep. Charles Perry (HD 83), has been referred to the Federalism & Fiscal Responsibility Committee. This bill nullifies Obamacare in Texas and interposes against taxes created or increased by it. It’s not captioned as such, but those of us who worked on this bill call it the “Texas Taxpayer Protection Act”.

Part of the bill states:

The assumption of power that the federal government has made by enacting the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (PPACA) interferes with the right of the people of the State of Texas to regulate health care as they see fit.

Also, the bill states the United States Supreme Court decision upholding the PPACA as a tax is invalid.  One of the reasons stated was:

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Arizona Gold and Silver Bill is in Jeopardy – Immediate Action Needed!

Arizona SB1439 – Gold and Silver Legal Tender, need to move out of the Rules Committee.

This bill is not a mandate, it simply allows those who choose to use gold and silver as payment the ability to do so, without extra taxes and regulations that already exist! Rep. Bob Robson chairs the committee. We need to call him immediately and let him know we want the full House to consider this important bill.

ACTION ITEMS for Arizona

1. Contact the House Rules Committee chair.  Politely request that he schedule SB1439 for a debate and vote in his committee.  And while you’re in touch with him, make sure to let him know – strongly, but respectfully – that you want him to vote YES on SB1439, sending the bill to the full state house.

Representative Bob Robson | (602) 926-5549

2.  Contact the rest of the members of the House rules committee.  Strongly, but politely, let them know you want them to vote YES on SB1439. Remind them that you expect them to support the Constitution, and that includes Article 1, Section 10 which says that the state needs to allow gold and silver to be used as legal tender. SB1439 will help facilitate this constitutional duty and you want a YES vote.

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Resolution to Nullify NDAA Indefinite Detention Passes in League City, Texas

By a vote of 7-1, the City Council of League City, Texas rejected NDAA indefinite detention and instructed all public agencies to refuse compliance with the unconstitutional federal act.

The resolution was sponsored by Council Member Heidi Theiss, who announced the result on her Facebook page on Tuesday night. “Many thanks to my fellow Council members who continue to stand for our Constitutional rights!

The resolution denounces the indefinite detention powers signed into law at the end of 2011, and subsequently defended in court by the Obama Administration as violations of the US and Texas Constitution. It reads, in part:

WHEREAS, the members of this City Council have taken an oath to uphold the Constitution of the United States of America and the Constitution of the State of Texas; and

WHEREAS, Sections 1021 and 1022 of the 2012 NDAA as they purport to authorize, 1) detainment of persons captured within the United States of America without charge or trial, 2) military tribunals for persons captured within the United States of America, and 3) the transfer of persons captured within the United States of America to foreign jurisdictions, are repugnant to the ‘general, great and essential principles of liberty and free government’ enshrined in Article 1 of the Texas Constitution: and

The key clause of the resolution is the one calling for full noncompliance with the federal government:

Instruct all our public agencies to decline requests by federal agencies acting under detention powers granted by the NDAA that could infringe upon residents’ freedom of speech, religion, assembly, privacy, or rights to counsel

As Judge Andrew Napolitano has said recently, such widespread noncompliance can make a federal law “nearly impossible to enforce” (video here)

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A Lawn Care Approach to Politics

The following is an excerpt from my book, Our Last Hope – Rediscovering the Lost Path to Libertylast_hope

Most Americans take a lawn care approach to politics.

From around mid-March through October, I spend about 90 minutes every week walking in circles around my yard, ears assailed by a deafening, monotonous drone. When I finish up, the grass looks really nice. Then, about three days later, the lawn begins to take on a bit of a raggedy look. By the next week, I have to repeat the process again.

And again.

And again.

Once I complete my weekly drudgery, I invariably begin pondering ways to make the grass just stop growing. Of course, I can’t. Grass grows. That’s its nature. Only one way exists to avoid the weekly mowing ritual. Fundamentally change the nature of my yard – as in rip out all of the grass by the roots.

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Oregon Bill Introduced to Nullify Unconstitutional Federal Marijuana and Hemp Laws

Legislation introduced  in Oregon would establish a regulatory system, similar to the one in place in the state for alcohol, for the cultivation, production, and sale of cannabis.

HB3371, An Act Relating to the Control, Regulation and Taxation of Cannabis Act, would set up a system of regulation for marijuana and hemp in Oregon. This legislation would allow adults to possess up to 24 ounces of usable marijuana and grow up to six plants in their homes, in addition to purchasing it from regulated retail outlets.

The purposes of sections 1 to 47 of this 2013 Act are:

(a) To establish a comprehensive state policy concerning Cannabis, which include:
marijuana and industrial hemp under existing state law;

(b) To protect the safety, welfare, health and peace of the people of this state by better
prioritizing the state’s limited law enforcement resources;

(c) To eliminate the problems caused by the prohibition and uncontrolled manufacture,
delivery and possession of marijuana within this state; and

(d) To ensure that the State Department of Agriculture issues industrial hemp licenses
and agricultural hemp seed production permits in accordance with existing state law.

The Committee on Revenue sponsored the bill.

Essential features of the measure as introduced include:

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