Is Finishing Your Vegetables Still Okay?

As a consumer, when you walk into most retail stores, you will notice that nearly every product sold has some form of labeling or information on it. Maybe it says where it was made, or what it was designed for. Maybe the product claims how it will make your life better or easier. Maybe it’s labeled with hazard signs or a Surgeon General warning. When it comes to food, most people would agree that they like to know what they’re going to put into their body before they consume it. And for the most part, food products are already mandated by the federal government (FDA) to show its contents. From how much sugar and fat it contains per serving, to if it contains high fructose corn syrup or aspartame. So why would labeling products that contain GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) be any different? Why does the FDA refuse to label genetically modified food?
Let’s first discuss what GMO means.

GMOs are plants or animals that have been genetically engineered with DNA from bacteria, viruses or other plants and animals. These experimental combinations of genes from different species cannot occur in nature or in traditional crossbreeding. Virtually all commercial GMOs are engineered to withstand direct application of herbicide and/or to produce an insecticide. Despite biotech industry promises, none of the GMO traits currently on the market offer increased yield, drought tolerance, enhanced nutrition, or any other consumer benefit. Meanwhile, a growing body of evidence connects GMOs with health problems, environmental damage and violation of farmers’ and consumers’ rights.

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Look locally to battle government intervention

The following was published as a letter to the editor in The Times-News of Burlington, NC The definition of nullify is: “any act, or set of actions that result in a particular law being rendered null, void or just simply unenforceable.” This does not mean erasing it from statute. The federal government is dependent on…

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Don’t Comply, Nullify!

In 1798 with the ink on the Constitution barely dry, the Alien and Sedition Acts were passed which featured provisions that made speaking ill of the government a crime.

And what was the answer to this unconstitutional “law”?

Kentucky, led by Thomas Jefferson, and Virginia, led by James Madison, helped pass nullification resolutions in opposition of the unconstitutional legislation. Fast forward five decades and multiple northern states took a stand to nullify the pro-slavery fugitive slave laws, federal legislation that required the return of runaway slaves. More recently state legislatures led a nullification movement against the REAL ID act that now includes over half of the states in the Union.

There are numerous other examples in our history, but let’s move little closer to the present.

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