Juggling Hats

Juggling Hats

I have often found myself wearing a few different hats when it comes to politics.  My personal views are libertarian in nature.  I really do believe in both the non-aggression principle and in property rights.  I also support the Constitution even when there are aspects of it which are anti-libertarian.  The term “Tenther” also applies to me as well.

Remember, the Constitution doesn’t grant us our rights, but acknowledges the natural rights we have which predates it.  There are also instances where the Constitution does legally violate our rights.  I would argue that the eminent domain clause of the Constitution is such a case.  The government shouldn’t be able to force me off my land unless I am willing to sell it.  Some will argue that sometimes public need justifies it.  Well, I would suggest reviewing the Kelo v. City of New London case in which transferred land from individuals to another private group.  This shows how granting power to a government entity will eventually abuse the said power.

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Bond v. U.S., no. 12-158

My “Amicus Brief” in Bond v. United States

In sum, there are at least two ways the Court in Bond can accommodate federalism without undermining national foreign policy. It can construe ambiguous treaties not to reach purely local conduct. And it can require Congress to make a plausible showing that federal regulation of local conduct is needed to prevent material breach of treaty obligations. Either approach would allow Bond to win the case without undermining national treaty power.

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“There is nothing in the Constitution which says the states are required to enforce or implement federal acts”
-Michael Boldin

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Washington State Flag

Washington State Firearms Freedom Act Returning in January

The Washington state legislature operates on a biennium, and this coming January begins its second year. Many bills that didn’t necessarily receive hearings, or have any movement last year, could still be picked back up in the new session – thought this is often a very difficult feat.

The state has a few tremendous legislators that are responsible for introducing many great liberty related bills. They are doing their part, and it’s up to us to do ours. By spreading the word about bills that work to protect our freedoms, we can increase our voice from last year and make a real difference in January.

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