Hurricane Irene, the Guard and the Constitution

The Burlington Free Press reports from Vermont,

Eight helicopters on loan from the Illinois National Guard were expected to arrive Tuesday night in Vermont to help the Vermont National Guard deliver food, medicine, water and other supplies to 13 Vermont towns cut off from the rest of the state in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene.

The outside helicopter support is needed because all six of the Vermont Guard’s Black Hawk helicopters are still in Iraq, where they and 55 Vermont soldiers are wrapping up a yearlong hospital transport mission, said Lt. Lloyd Goodrow, spokesman for the Vermont Guard.

Hurricane Irene reminded the East Coast why Mother Nature can be one of the most dangerous forces on the planet, when she struck hard this past weekend. When all was said and done, dozens of lives were lost and many more left without a home, while billions of dollars in damage was caused. One of the States that felt the wrath of Irene was Vermont, which saw widespread flooding and a few deaths. First responders, volunteer organizations, and neighbors were all on hand to help with the rescue and rebuilding efforts as the hurricane exited the State. Outside help had to be requested however, as all six of the Vermont National Guard’s Black Hawk helicopters were serving in Iraq. Luckily, New Hampshire and Illinois’ National Guards came to the rescue, but this still serves as a reminder of the effect that misuse of the militia has on our country.

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Trenton Becomes Fourth Town To Declare Food Sovereignty in Maine

Today, the town of Trenton became the fourth Maine town to pass the Food Sovereignty Ordinance, joining Sedgwick, Penobscot, and Blue Hill. Trenton has become the latest in a growing Tenth Amendment movement in Maine, where a number of Tenth Amendment related bills have been introduced in the Legislature alongside the Town level sovereignty movement.…

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On the Intrastate Commerce Act

From the Maine Tenth Amendment Center:

Below is the written testimony submitted to Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary in regards to LD 1172, “An Act To Prohibit Enforcement of Federal Laws in Violation of the Constitution of the United States,” otherwise known as the Intrastate Commerce Act.

Testimony of Chris Dixon (Maine Tenth Amendment Center) on LD 1172, “An Act To Prohibit Enforcement of Federal Laws in Violation of the Constitution of the United States” May 5, 2011

Senator Hastings, Representative Ness, and members of the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary. My name is Chris Dixon and I live in Lisbon Falls, Maine. I am in favor of LD 1172.

The United States Constitution was written to replace the Articles of Confederation, which was generally held to be failing among the founding generation. It became understood that the absolute lack of a Federal Government would be counterproductive to a union of sovereign states, but at the same time, they also knew that the response should not be an all-powerful central government. Thus, there was a careful balance created where a list of enumerated powers were given and the States and the people would reserve the rest of the powers.

The Tenth Amendment states “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” The powers delegated to the United States Government are found in Article 1, Section 8; Section 9 lists the limits on their powers, while Section 10 lists the powers prohibited to the States.

Clause 3 of Article 1, Section 8 states one of the powers of the government is “To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes.” The power was granted to the Federal Government to regulate commerce crossing State lines to ensure quarreling did not occur among the several states and thus become problematic, as it had under the Articles of Confederation. James Madison, principal author of the Constitution, noted in a 1829 letter that “…it is very certain that it grew out of the abuse of the power by the importing States in taxing the nonimporting, and was intended as a negative and preventive provision against injustice among the States themselves, rather than as a power to be used for the positive purposes of the General Government, in which alone, however, the remedial power could be lodged.” The Commerce Clause did not, however, grant the Federal Government the power to regulate commerce within State lines.

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Maine Intrastate Commerce Act Hearing Scheduled

Maine LD 1172, “An Act To Prohibit Enforcement of Federal Laws in Violation of the Constitution of the United States”, will be going before the Joint Standing Committee On Judiciary on May 5th. It will be in Room 438 of the State House at 1:30 P.M. A workshop is also scheduled for May 9th, same time and place. This bill is one of the most important bills of the session, as it takes a stand for not only the United States Constitution and the rights of the States to govern themselves, it also takes a stand for the local commerce of Mainers.

Please help support the bill by showing up at the hearing and voicing your support  for this important piece of legislation. Until then, contact the committee members and respectfully urge them to support this bill.

Below  is the contact information for the Joint Standing Committee On Judiciary:

Senator David R. Hastings, III (R-Oxford), Chair
E-mail: dhastings@hastings-law.com

Senator Richard G. Woodbury (U-Cumberland)
E-mail: Dick.Woodbury@legislature.maine.gov

Senator Phil L. Bartlett II (D-Cumberland)
E-mail: phil@philbartlett.com

Representative Joan M. Nass (R-Acton), Chair
E-mail: RepJoan.Nass@legislature.maine.gov

Representative G. Paul Waterhouse (R-Bridgton)
E-mail: RepPaul.Waterhouse@legislature.maine.gov

Representative Michael G. Beaulieu (R-Auburn)
Personal E-mail: mike@mikeformaine.org
State House E-mail: RepMike.Beaulieu@legislature.maine.gov

Representative Ralph W. Sarty, Jr. (R-Denmark)
Personal E-mail:  rwsarty@fairpoint.net
State House E-mail: RepRalph.Sarty@legislature.maine.gov

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Maine House Passes Tenth Amendment Resolution

This week, the Maine House Of Representatives voted 79-67, to pass a Tenth Amendment Resolution introduced by Representative Rich Cebra (R-Naples). The vote was almost party line, with all Republicans present voting for the Resolution and all but two Democrats present voting against. The two Democrats who voted in favor of the resolution are Representatives Stephen Hanley (D-Gardiner) and Michael Shaw (D-Standish).

Rep. Cebra has previously introduced a Tenth Amendment Resolution when the Legislature was under Democratic control, but it failed to make it out of committee.

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Maine Bill Would Nullify Unconstitutional Intrastate Commerce Laws

A bill has been introduced by Representative Mel Newendyke (R-Litchfield) that, if passed, would nullify all Federal laws that violate the Constitution by regulating intrastate commerce laws. The Tenth Amendment states that all laws not specifically given to the Federal Government or prohibited to the States, are then left to the States and the people.…

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DHS Extends REAL ID Deadline Once Again

The battle between the States and the Federal Government over REAL ID will continue on another two years, as the Federal Government prolongs implementation once more. The controversial law, passed in 2005, took unconstitutional steps to compel the States to conform to their standards in regards to driver’s licenses and identification cards. Introduced by U.S. Representative James Sensenbrenner (R-Wisconsin), it failed to go through and only met success when attached as a rider to the bill, Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief, 2005. Rep. Sensenbrenner is also the sponsor of the controversial and unconstitutional USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, which was introduced in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

The Maine Legislature under Democratic control, led the way for America in a resistance that would include over half of the country, by calling for the repeal of the bill. A bill that would not allow Maine to participate in a national identification card system was introduced by former State Representative Scott Lansley (R-Sabattus) and would become law. Both the Resolution and the Bill had overwhelming support from both Democrats and Republicans, who came together in a bipartisan effort to stand up for rights of Mainers.

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Maine Town Declares Food Sovereignty, Nullifies Conflicting Laws

The Maine town of Sedgwick took an interesting step that brings a new dynamic to the movement to maintain sovereignty: Town-level nullification. Last Friday, the town passed a proposed ordinance that would empower the local level to grow and sell food amongst themselves without interference from unconstitutional State or Federal regulations. Beyond that, the passed ordinance would make it unlawful for agents of either the State or Federal government to execute laws that interfere with the ordinance.

Under the new ordinance, producers and processors are protected from licensure or inspection in sales that are sold for home consumption between them and a patron, at farmer’s market, or at a roadside stand. The ordinance specifically notes the right of the people to food freedom, as well as citing the U.S. Declaration of Independence and Maine Constitution in defending the rights of the people.

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Snowe Challenger Scott D’Amboise Signs 10-4 Pledge

U.S. Senator Olympia Snowe, controversial moderate Republican from Maine, has been facing increasing opposition as the constitutional awareness among Americans continues to rise. In a 2009 Public Policy Polling survey, it was found that she has lost a lot of ground when in years past, her shaky stances would gain her popularity as a bipartisan moderate. A conservative candidate would have the upper hand by over ten percent against her.

Scott D’Amboise, a life-long Mainer, announced his candidacy over a year ago. Born and raised in Carmel, Maine, he graduated from Hermon High School and attended the University of Maine. He lives currently in Lisbon Falls, where he has served as Town Selectman.

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The Mainstream Hates Nullification

Podcast: Play in new window | Download The Forgotten Men, a radio show based out of Maryland, featured author, economist, and one of nullification’s front line defenders in Tom Woods. A nice surprise as well, was the mentioning of the Maine Tenth Amendment Center’s recent commentary on the mainstream media’s ongoing war against the idea that States…

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