Strong City, Kansas Joins the Fight to Protect the Second Amendment

As we’ve reported previously: in August, Herndon, KS Mayor Kenny Chartier sent an email to “[every] municipality, city and town in the state of Kansas [with] an e-mail address,” urging them to pass ordinances similar to Herndon’s in support of the Second Amendment Protection Act, which was signed into law by Governor Brownback in April. Three cities have since answered that call: Muscotah, Easton, and most recently, Strong City.

At their September 10 meeting, the Strong City city council passed the Right to Bear Arms Ordinance into law with a margin of 5-0.

“No agency of the City of Strong City, KS, or person in the employ of the City of Strong City, KS shall enforce, provide material support for, or participate in any way in the enforcement of any act, law, treaty, order, rule or regulation of the government of the United States regarding personal firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition within the Boundary of this City of Strong City, KS.” —Right to Bear Arms Ordinance, Strong City, KS

Details

Easton, KS Passes Ordinance to Nullify Federal Gun Control

“ANY act, law, treaty, order, rule or regulation of the government of the United States which violates the Second Amendment to the Constitution of the United States is null, void and unenforceable in the State of Kansas.” -Second Amendment Protection Act  [emphasis added] So echoed the city of Easton, KS on September 3rd with the…

Details

Is Utah Becoming ‘Tread-proof’?

SALT LAKE CITY – With the passage of HB 131, the Constitutional and Federalism Defense Act, Utah has taken a firm stance against the central government’s assault on states’ rights. “[If] we want to be a sovereign we have to act like one,” said Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, committee co-chair. The bill, signed by Gov.…

Details

Federal Court Decides: Federal Rangers Supreme

In a move that would make Joseph Story and John Marshall rise from their graves and offer him high-fives, 10th Circuit Judge David Nuffer made himself the sole arbiter of federal and state powers, ruling last Friday that federal park rangers’ authority supersedes that of the State of Utah in matters concerning local law.nuffer

Gov. Gary Herbert signed  HB155, on April 3. The new law prohibits federal Land Management officers from acting as agents of state and local law by “limiting the authority of specified federal employees to exercise law enforcement authority within Utah.” The bill came in response to officers of the Forestry Service taking it upon themselves to administer local traffic laws, making such unauthorized actions class-B misdemeanors; punishable by a $1,000 fine and six months in jail.

We don’t want Utah citizens going before a federal magistrate for a speeding ticket,” said Utah AG Swallow, in the AG’s press release on May 13. “Federal officers should be enforcing federal laws and state and local officers should be enforcing state and local laws. We are concerned about the federal government once again encroaching on states rights and we will vigorously defend the constitutionality of HB 155.[Emphasis added.]

Federal attorneys promptly sued, and on May 13th, Nuffer granted a temporary injunction, stopping the law from taking effect. Last Friday’s ruling extends the injunction until the issue is settled at trial.

Details