Nullification in Action: New Jersey Opens Second Medical Marijuana Dispensary

With 21 states nullifying federal marijuana laws, it’s become clear that nullification works.

As Judge Andrew Napolitano has said, the federal government doesn’t have the resources to enforce all of its laws and edicts  if the states simple refuse to comply or assist.

New Jersey passed medical marijuana back in 2010.  On Oct. 28, Compassionate Care Foundation opened New Jersey’s second dispensary in Egg Harbor Township. The first dispensary opened in Montclair last December.

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Juggling Hats

Juggling Hats

I have often found myself wearing a few different hats when it comes to politics.  My personal views are libertarian in nature.  I really do believe in both the non-aggression principle and in property rights.  I also support the Constitution even when there are aspects of it which are anti-libertarian.  The term “Tenther” also applies to me as well.

Remember, the Constitution doesn’t grant us our rights, but acknowledges the natural rights we have which predates it.  There are also instances where the Constitution does legally violate our rights.  I would argue that the eminent domain clause of the Constitution is such a case.  The government shouldn’t be able to force me off my land unless I am willing to sell it.  Some will argue that sometimes public need justifies it.  Well, I would suggest reviewing the Kelo v. City of New London case in which transferred land from individuals to another private group.  This shows how granting power to a government entity will eventually abuse the said power.

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Texas Wins Abortion Law Appeal

On Oct. 31, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans reversed much of Judge Lee Yeakel’s ruling blocking sections of a tough Texas abortion law.

This will now allow many of the provisions of the Texas Abortion Law to go into effect immediately.

The appellate  judges ruled that the restrictions on doctors can take effect while the lawsuit challenging the law moves forward, according to the Associated Press.

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NSA Stores All Collectable Browsing Data For 365 Days

The Guardian recently released information indicating that the  NSA stores vast amounts of our personal data in a repository codenamed, “Marina” and has the ability to look back over all our data for a year.

The Obama administration has repeatedly stated they are only keeping the data of people who they are intentionally targeting, but internal documents still reveal they are storing vast amounts of data.

The data that they are collecting can vary to include a user’s browser history, email, contact lists and possibly even account passwords. According to Guardian reporter James Ball:

“The Marina metadata application tracks a user’s browser experience, gathers contact information/content and develops summaries of target,” the analysts’ guide explains. “This tool offers the ability to export the data in a variety of formats, as well as create various charts to assist in pattern-of-life development.”

The guide goes on to explain Marina’s unique capability: “Of the more distinguishing features, Marina has the ability to look back on the last 365 days’ worth of DNI metadata seen by the Sigint collection system, regardless whether or not it was tasked for collection.” [Emphasis in original.]

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Oregon Governor Signs Anti-Drone Bill Into Law

On July 29, Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber (D) signed the Anti-Drone Spying bill (HB2710) into law.

The new law will require law enforcement to obtain a warrant for drone use in all but a few cases.

Provides that drones may be used by law enforcement agency for purpose of surveillance of persons only pursuant to a warrant or in emergency circumstances. Provides that law enforcement agencies may use drones to intercept communications only as provided under laws relating to wiretaps other interceptions of communications. Requires destruction of images and other information acquired by use of drone within 30 days.

The bill also outlaws weaponized drones.

Representative John Huffman (R ) said, “I feel that we were able to craft our bill to get ahead of the curve and ensure people’s rights were protected — but also to let Insitu and other companies in the industry know that we are willing to work with them.”

The House passed its version of the bill 52-7 on April 15. The Senate passed the amended version 23-5 on June 10th. The differences between the two bills were resolved in committee, and it was sent to the governor for his signature.

While the exceptions for drone use raise legitimate concerns, as things existed,  Oregonians had no protections against drone surveillance. Law enforcement agencies in Oregon could use drones any time, anywhere, with absolutely no parameters. Under the new law, drone use will be extremely limited and circumscribed.

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