Oklahoma Bill Would Curb “Policing for Profit” via Asset Forfeiture, Federal Loophole Remains

OKLAHOMA CITY (Nov. 6, 2015) – A bill up for consideration when the Oklahoma state legislature returns from recess in Feb. 2016 would reform asset forfeiture laws by prohibiting the state from taking property without a criminal conviction. But it leaves open a big loophole that would allow the practice to continue under federal forfeiture programs.


Nullification: “If you love liberty you can’t stand the federal government”

In an interview with then-Mises Institute vice-president Jeffrey Tucker, Tom Woods talks about his book Nullification and the concepts behind the political doctrine in connection with the Tenth Amendment. They also go through the history of nullification, starting with the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions, written by James Madison and Thomas Jefferson respectively, in response to the Alien and Sedition Act.



Debate Over Reforming Asset Forfeiture Laws in Tennessee Heats Up; Beware of Feds

NASHVILLE (Nov. 3, 2015) – Tennessee has joined the growing number of states considering reforming state asset forfeiture laws.

Last week, the state Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the matter, and law enforcement lobbyists predictably showed up in force to defend their ability to “police for profit.”


Does the Constitution Allow a Female President? Originalism Says Yes. Some Types of Nonoriginalism May Say No.

This might seem like an odd question, but a journalist recently asked me my opinion about the matter.  It turns out that Article II of the Constitution refers to the President as a him.  For example: “He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years.”  If this “he” meant only a male person, there would be a strong argument that the President had to be a male.


Florida Bill Would Fully Decriminalize Marijuana; Effectively Nullify Federal Prohibition

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (Nov. 2, 2015) – Two bills introduced in the Florida legislature would remove cannabis from the state’s schedule of controlled substances, treating marijuana like any other plant under state law. The proposal would not only completely decriminalize marijuana in the Sunshine State, it would also take a big step toward nullifying federal cannabis prohibition in practice in Florida.