The NSA is a Stalker

In a revelation that should be a surprise to nobody, The New York Times recently reported  that the NSA conducted a secret program that collected the cell phone data of Americans in order to track their location.

This program ran from 2010 to 2011 and used data from cell towers to track the location of users’ cell phones, according to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. Essentially, the NSA was using phone data to virtually follow people.

An official familiar with the test project said its purpose was to see how the locational data would flow into the N.S.A.’s systems. While real data was used, it was never drawn upon in any investigation, the official said. It was unclear how many Americans’ locational data was collected as part of the project, whether the agency has held on to that information or why the program did not go forward, according to the Times.

The program is now allegedly discontinued, but Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) does not feel that we know the whole truth about it.

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big-brother-schools

NSA on Campus: Big Brother Is Recruiting Your Kids

NSA on Campus: Big Brother Is Recruiting Your KidsThe illegal spiers at the NSA are looking for impressionable youngsters to do their bidding, according to a recent press release.

The Air Force Institute of Technology at Ohio, Auburn University in Alabama, Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania, and Mississippi State University have been given a CAE-Cyber Operations designation in the NSA’s desperate attempt “to cultivate more U.S. cyber professionals in an ever-changing global environment.”

The NSA is redoubling its efforts to create and maintain their Orwellian surveillance system, and they’re banking on compliance and assistance from America’s youth. Both students and facility will be targeted under this program by the rapacious government snoopers and recruited into the massive surveillance bureaucracy.

This is yet another example of big government using the higher education system to do their bidding. In another instance, the University of Maryland recently receive over $10 million from the Department of Homeland Security to produce ‘intelligence’ that classified advocates of decentralized government as potential terrorists. Thus, any type of partnership between big government and higher education must be looked at with an extreme amount of caution.

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Dianne Feinsten Defends NSA Spying, We Push Back

Dianne Feinsten Defends NSA SpyingLast week, during a hearing in the Imperial Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Dianne Feinsten went to bat for the NSA – defending their wildly unconstitutional spying program as “lawful, effective and constitutional”

This is in light of the fact that the NSA intends to collect all U.S. telephone records and put them in a searchable “lock box” in the interest of “national security.” That’s how PCWorld reported on what General Keith Alexander, the NSA’s director, told U.S. senators.

There is no upper limit” on NSA telephone-records collection, Alexander said. “I believe it is in the nation’s best interest to put all the phone records into a lock box that we can search when the nation needs to do it.”

Fact: The 4th Amendment doesn’t authorize this kind of mass intrusion into your privacy, no matter what these people happen to say.

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Alternative to University Research Funding for NSA Projects

Many think university research is funded by tuition and student fees. This is false. In fact, research in colleges (both public and private) gets most of its funding through federal grants.

In scientific research, a majority of these federal grants comes from the NIH, NSF, and DoE. Some of it comes from private sources, but most flows from federal sources. And private funding becomes harder to get every year. The Ghostbusters line sums it up: “Personally, I liked the university. They gave us money and facilities, we didn’t have to produce anything! You’ve never been out of college! You don’t know what it’s like out there! I’ve worked in the private sector. They expect results.”

This being the case, getting universities to stop accepting federal grants that promote NSA won’t be easy and will call for some creative thinking. But it’s not and impossible task.

What we need is funding competition.

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Blueprint to Nullify the NSA: 4th Amendment Protection Act

For far too long, Americans blindly obeyed the “national security” experts at the cost of personal liberty.

Fortunately a healthy trend of defiance has been eclipsing that mindset and the Fourth Amendment is making a comeback.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Never before has the Fourth Amendment been under such assault as by the National Security Agency (NSA). The NSA has a secret spying program that’s not so secret now thanks to whistleblower Edward Snowden. Once Americans learned their online, phone, and texting communications were being watched and stored without probable cause or a warrant, they demanded accountability. Polls from Quinnipiac, Pew, Rassmussen, and others all show Americans don’t trust their liberty under this so-called anti-terrorism policy.

Division of power makes America great, and protects the liberty our founders dreamed of and fought for. The role of states isn’t to simply salute and follow federal orders. The Fourth Amendment Protection Act instructs the people’s state officials on how to deal with federal officials enforcing unconstitutional surveillance.

Learn about it and start working to get it passed, here:
http://tenthamendmentcenter.com/4thamendmentprotection

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Obama Administration Removes Ban on Warrantless Surveillance of Americans

President Obama sought and obtained permission from a secret surveillance court to disregard previously enacted restrictions on the domestic, warrantless spying programs of the National Security Agency (NSA), the Washington Post reports.

According to sources cited in the story, in 2011, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates, former chief judge of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, issued an order “permitting the agency [NSA] to search deliberately for Americans’ communications in its massive databases.”

Also included in the order was an extension of the amount of time the NSA can store the electronic communication data it collects in the United States. Prior to the judge’s decision, such files could be retained for only five years; the limit was pushed back to six years by the terms of the ruling.

The order, the story claims, reversed an “explicit ban” on such unconstitutional searches imposed by the same court in 2008. These restrictions reportedly were “not previously acknowledged.”

A decision of this type would cause immediate and irreparable harm to the Constitution and the right of Americans — and all free people — to be free from unwarranted surveillance by agents of their own government.

What’s more troubling and tyrannical is the fact that none of these changes to exceptions to the Fourth Amendment was ever debated or passed by the people’s elected representatives in Congress. Rather, this fundamental civil liberty was repealed by a judicial appointee at the behest of the very department who sought the expanded authority.

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Obama Packs Surveillance Review Board With D.C. Insiders

After the uproar over his plan to appoint Director of National Intelligence James Clapper to head his intelligence review board, President Obama promised to pack the group with “outside experts.”

News of the names of board members reveals that the president’s definition of “outside” comes from somewhere outside the dictionary.

The five men tapped to lead the panel known officially as the Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies are Richard A. Clarke (shown), Michael Morell, Cass Sunstein, Geoffrey Stone, and Peter Swire.

It would be challenging to assemble a group more “inside” the government.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s response to the announcement of the board members sums up the situation exactly. Said EFF: “A task force led by General Clapper full of insiders — and not directed to look at the extensive abuse — will never get at the bottom of the unconstitutional spying.”

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