West Virginia Democrat Suggests Turning off Power to Feds?

In federal elections, campaign ads from candidates of all political stripes have a tendency to be boisterous and full of big promises.  When a president’s popularity is high in a midterm election, people of the same party will boast of their association with him, while people of the other major party highlight their willingness to “reach across the aisle.”  When those same approval numbers are low, the opposition will strike, and fellow party members rush to paint themselves as different from the chief executive, so in some ways, the new campaign ad from West Virginia Secretary of State and US Senate candidate Natalie Tennant is nothing new.

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Yes on 122: Arizona Voters have an opportunity to opt-out of federal programs

This fall, Arizona voters have the chance to honor the spirit of James Madison by voting Yes on Proposition 122. If passed, the state constitutional amendment would make the feds enforce, enact and pay for its unconstitutional actions and programs on their own.

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Arizona Citizens Will Vote to Nullify FDA Restrictions on the Very Sick

The FDA has become infamous for its corporate protectionism and interference with allowing new treatments in the marketplace, but an Arizona ballot proposition could spell the beginning of the end for the dominating bureaucracy.

The Tenth Amendment Center urges Arizona residents vote YES on Prop. 303 and nullify FDA control over treatment of terminally ill patients.

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Why Doesn’t the Tenth Amendment Center Endorse Political Candidates?

politicianMany of the liberty-minded and tea party groups in Tennessee and across the country are gearing up for the 2014 elections. Groups and coalitions are forming up to “beat this guy” or “elect that gal.” This is all well and good. Getting good people who understand constitutional principles into office and keeping them there is a noble and important endeavor.

Not surprisingly, the Tenth Amendment Center gets constant requests to endorse candidates, or join coalitions to choose candidates to run for a particular office. A few months ago, a Tennessee state politician offered the Tenth Amendment Center $1,000 to support a campaign for federal office. Needless to say, the offer was flatly refused.

The Tenth Amendment Center does not endorse candidates or politicians, and it never will.

Here’s why.

People aren’t infallible.

First, people disappoint. With rare exceptions, even politicians that start out with the best of intentions and a commitment to their principles become corrupted over time with access to power. It’s a given that no human being is perfect or infallible. That’s why we maintain our allegiance to the ideals and principles of the Constitution – never politicians.

While we work with a elected officials to accomplish our goals, we are adamant about maintaining our objectivity and independence. Suppose a politician runs a good Tenth Amendment bill, then turns around and does something incredibly stupid. An endorsement implies that we support all aspects of a politician’s policy initiatives. But by maintaining our objectivity, we can praise elected officials when they do the right things, and call out politicians when they stray.  Keeping our distance from campaigns keeps us from getting caught in the predicament of having to ignoring bad behavior because of an endorsement.

Chasing every barking dog…

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