How do Local molehills Become National Moutains? Health Care

This article is a Part 2 of “How Local Mole Hills Become National Mountains” series.  (Part 1 HERE)

A “molehill” is a problem.  It’s not a fun problem or an easy problem to handle, but it is a smaller problem than say 1 million molehills stacked on top of each other. In other words, a mountain.

Health care is a molehill.

It is a personal, family, market (global) and possibly a local community issue, specifically with regard to common health problems in a local community.  This health care molehill simply requires a patient with a health need, and groups of health professionals and wellness industry leaders with capabilities to meet the need.  Health Care, aka Sick care, is NOT a national mountain requiring national earth movers supplied by Congress and regulatory agencies.

Local, decentralized solutions serve individuals better.

I travel about half of my work life, and without fail, I see people during my travels.  I mean, they are everywhere!  On the road going to the airport, waiting in line at the airport coffee stand, sitting next to me on the flight, flying the plane, walking around my arrival city, sitting at the hotel. I could go on and on.  And it’s really great to see people, because for the most part, I enjoy them. Occasionally, the feeling is even mutual.  People come in all sorts of shapes and sizes, to be sure, but there are some common physical and physiological themes I’ve become keenly aware of. One hundred percent of them have a head, presumably with a functioning brain controlling a lot of automatic functions in their body, including a pumping heart, muscle movements, digestion, elimination and so forth.

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The “American People” and ObamaCare

The “American People” and ObamaCare

I find it interesting to hear all the media pundits claiming that the “American People” are against a government shut-down and blame Republicans for using ObamaCare as a negotiation tool.

If the States that are united were founded on a principle of a consolidated nation, where a “National” government ruled over them, then it is possible the pundits may have it correct. However, that is not how the founding generation envisioned our union of States. We are made up of individual and sovereign entities that united to form a more perfect union. These States then delegated certain limited authority to the Federal government. It was very clear to nearly everyone involved that the States would retain the majority of their sovereign powers. This is one of the reasons that the Tenth Amendment was inserted into the Bill of Rights. What does it say?:

“The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”

Who were those people? The people of the individual States, not the people of a giant conglomerate. If any self-respecting news journalist or historian for that matter, would take the time to read the debates of the several States during their ratifying process they would then understand the principle.

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Ohio Governor Attempting Backdoor Obamacare Medicaid Expansion

For most of 2013, fiscal conservatives in Ohio have been battling Governor John Kasich over his desire to support President Obama’s “Affordable Care Act” through the expansion of Medicaid in our state. After failing to win support from the Republican-dominated Ohio General Assembly, Kasich is now attempting to expand Medicaid and implement “Obamacare” without the consent of the majority of our citizens or our state legislature.

On Friday, in an attempt to circumvent Ohio’s General Assembly, the Kasich administration requested that the Ohio Controlling Board appropriate Obamacare funds to expand Medicaid with billions in federal funding.

Because Kasich did not issue an executive order, the Controlling Board is supposed to be guided by the premise that they shall take no action that is contrary to the legislative intent of Ohio’s general assembly. Based on the legislature’s stance to date, the Controlling Board, which consists of four Republican legislators, two Democrat legislators and one member on the governor’s staff, should not grant Kasich’s request.

Not surprisingly, both Democrats are supporting Kasich’s Progressive effort to expand Medicaid, despite their responsibility to reject his request if it is contrary to the wishes of the legislature. As such, all Kasich will need to do to be able to thwart the will of the people that elected him is to convince ONE of the four Republican legislators on the board to vote with him.

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