Yes on 122: Arizona Voters have an opportunity to opt-out of federal programs

This fall, Arizona voters have the chance to honor the spirit of James Madison by voting Yes on Proposition 122. If passed, the state constitutional amendment would make the feds enforce, enact and pay for its unconstitutional actions and programs on their own.

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NLRB v. Noel Canning and Originalism

First, congratulations to co-blogger Mike Rappaport for having two of his articles cited multiple times in yesterday’s recess appointments decision, NLRB v. Noel Canning. Second, my quick takeaway is that the case is a win for originalism.  True, the majority opinion (Breyer, writing for Kennedy, Ginsburg, Sotomayor and Kagan) is an ugly bit of non-originalism.  But…

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Oklahoma Reaffirms Gold and Silver As Legal Tender Under New Law

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 11, 2014 – Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has signed a bill into law that declares gold and silver as legal tender within the state. Signed last week, Senate Bill 862 (SB862) was introduced by Sen. Clark Jolley and Rep. Gary Banz, with co-sponsorship from Sen. Natham Dahm. It reads, in part: Gold…

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A Partial Defense of the Majority Opinion in Bond v. United States

Chief Justice Roberts’ majority opinion in Bond v. United States has been sharply criticized (see here and here), so I’ll say few words partially in its favor. The case has seemed odd from the beginning because the federal statute at issue implements the Chemical Weapons Convention and (as the majority says) the local misuse of household chemicals does not seem the type of activity that is likely to implicate an international treaty. 

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Some Responses on McCutcheon and Campaign Finance Legislation

Michael Perry writes:

I share your originalist misgivings about the plurality and Thomas opinions in McCutcheon. However, a reader of your most recent post on the mattermight conclude that you have bought into the “expected applications” version of originalism, and I doubt you mean to do that!  So, you might want to say something further about the version of originalism you are bringing to bear in expressing your misgivings about the McCutcheon opinions.

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This question just came in on our feedback forum, and I thought it was important enough to discuss that I’d share my answer here.

QUESTION: Is the principle of anti-commandeering synonymous with nullification

ANSWER:  It depends on how you define the word “nullification”

Many believe that it is defined only as John Calhoun did in 1830′s South Carolina.

Anti-commandeering is not that process.

What it is, though, is a 100% legal process, backed up by years of Supreme Court precedent, which says that the feds cannot “commandeer” state resources to carry out a federal act or regulatory program. In other words, the states are free to decide if they will participate or not.

Recognizing that many, if not most, federal programs rely heavily on this kind of cooperation, by enacting anti-commandeering laws on various issues around the country, they can have the effect of a practical nullification – rendering federal acts “nearly impossible to enforce”

 

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