Hawaii Action Alert: Help Protect Terminally-Ill Against FDA, Support HB92, HB882 and SB585

Hawaii HB92, HB882 and SB585 would effectively nullify some FDA restrictions on terminally ill patients. HB92 and HB882 must pass through the House Health Committee successfully, and SB585 must pass through the Senate Health Committee successfully before the bills can receive full votes in their respective chambers. Take the following action steps to support these important…

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California Action Alert: Help Protect Terminally-Ill From FDA Restrictions, AB159 and SB149

California AB159 and SB149 would effectively nullify some FDA restrictions on terminally ill patients. AB159 must pass through the Assembly Health Committee successfully, and SB149 must pass through the Senate Rules Committee successfully before the bills can receive full votes in their respective chambers. Take the following action steps to support these important bills.

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Arkansas “Right to Try” Bill Would Nullify Some FDA Regulations, Help Terminally-Ill

A bill prefiled in Arkansas this week would effectively nullify some Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rules that prevent treatments from being used by terminally ill patients. Senate Bill 4 (SB4), the Right to Try Act, authored by Sen. John Cooper (R-21), is the latest pushback against the FDA and their controversial methodology of approving…

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Surprisingly, FDA gets the commerce clause right?

A May 16th Food and Drug Administration news release reported that U.S. Marshals had seized more than $11,185,000 worth of unapproved drugs. They did this at the request of the FDA because the medications are unapproved and misbranded drugs under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

The FDA complaint for forfeiture in paragraph 3 states, “articles of drug, as described in the caption, which articles were shipped in interstate commerce from outside the state of Ohio.”

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Solution: Label GMO Food Locally

Ever since food became easier and more profitable to create by machinery the government has tried to regulate it in some sort of fashion. The first English regulation of such was the Assize of Bread and Ale around the year 1266. In America the first endeavour into regulating food came in 1862 when President Lincoln launched the Department of Agriculture and the Bureau of Chemistry. These two organizations operated in what today we call the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) or the Agriculture Department. Later on in 1906 the Pure Food and Drugs Act was passed and what we now call the Food and Drug Administration was formed. Through these early regulatory adoptions it was aimed to raise the standards in food and their truthfulness in packaging. The nutrition labels that we all now know were mandated in 1990 through the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act (NLEA) and amended by the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA) of 2004.

But how far do we go in demanding how manufacturers produce and label their food? Specifically speaking, how far can we go on a federal level? On a state level? Already, we have numerous states with specific laws for food that is imported or exported from that state  above and beyond the federal requirements.

This raises a question: should we rely on one-size-fits-all mandates from D.C.? Or would we be better served allowing states to determines the extent of their food labeling?

Considering the way big agribusiness manipulates the federal system, we might want to consider a more decentralized approach.

On March 26th President Obama signed HR 933 – called the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 – into law to stop the shutdown of the American government. Buried in this bill, we find the Farmer Assurance Provision – aka the “Monsanto Protection Act.” Lawmakers sneaked in Section 735 giving special privileges to companies that deal with genetically modified organisms (GMO), even allowing them to continue producing crops even if a court finds them harmful – which very well may not entirely be the case. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) said that he will introduce legislation in the Farm Bill of 2013 to repeal the Monsanto Protection Act.

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