Permission Not Required: Constitutional Carry Bill up for Consideration in Louisiana

BATON ROUGE, La. (March 5, 2018) –  A so-called  “Constitutional Carry” bill prefiled in the Louisiana House would make it legal for state residents 21 and over to carry a firearm without a license. Passage of the bill would also foster an environment hostile to federal gun control.

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Podcast: The Second Amendment Wasn’t For Hunters

The recent school shooting in Florida has reignited the debate on guns.

In this episode of Thoughts from Maharrey Head, I wade into the fray and tackle a common myth related to the Second Amendment – this strange idea that it was never intended to allow people to own military weapons. Actually, that’s exactly what it was intended to do.

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Maryland Bill Would Help Protect Medical Marijuana Users’ Right to Keep and Bear Arms

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (Feb. 13, 2018) – A bill introduced in the Maryland House would protect medical marijuana users’ right to possess firearms in the state. It would also help foster an environment hostile to federal gun control and take another step toward nullifying unconstitutional marijuana prohibition.

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Bill Would Make Tennessee a Gun Rights “Sanctuary State”

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Jan. 12, 2018) – A bill introduced in the Tennessee House would prohibit state cooperation with enforcement of federal and international gun control, giving effect to legislation signed into law over the last two years. If passed, the law would help end any such gun control within the state in practice and effect.

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New Hampshire Bill Would Tie State Definition of Firearms to Federal Statute

CONCORD, N.H. (Jan. 10, 2018) – A bill introduced in the New Hampshire Senate would change the definition of a “firearm” in the state to coincide with federal statute. Passage of this bill would expand regulation of firearms accessories in New Hampshire and empower the federal government to indirectly dictate gun laws in the Live Free or Die State.

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North Carolina Bill would Nullify Many Federal Gun Laws

North Carolina is the latest state to take a stand against federal gun control laws, as the Second Amendment Protection Act is now making its way through their State House.

House Bill 518 was introduced on Tuesday and is co-sponsored by an impressive 22 legislators with Reps. Jones, Holloway, R. Brown and Millis as the primary sponsors. It was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary on Wednesday where it awaits further action.

The bill states that “The North Carolina General Assembly finds that the right to keep and bear arms is a fundamental right. The North Carolina General Assembly affirms this right as a constitutionally protected right in this State… This Article applies to firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition that are manufactured in North Carolina.”

The bill continues on to lay out rules to protect firearm and firearm accessories made in North Carolina saying, “A personal firearm, a firearm accessory, or ammunition that is manufactured commercially or privately in North Carolina and that remains exclusively within the borders of North Carolina is not subject to federal law, federal taxation, or federal regulation, including registration, under the authority of the United States Congress to regulate interstate commerce. It is declared by the North Carolina General Assembly that those items have not traveled in interstate commerce.”

To clarify any possible loopholes that the Feds may try to exploit within the law, the bill very specifically states, “The authority of the United States Congress to regulate interstate commerce in basic materials does not include authority to regulate firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition made within North Carolina borders from those materials. Firearms accessories that are imported into North Carolina from another state and that are subject to federal regulation as being in interstate commerce do not subject a firearm to federal regulation under interstate commerce because the firearm accessory is attached to or used in conjunction with a firearm in North Carolina.”

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