Kentucky senate considering bill to nullify common core

SB224 declares that the Commonwealth of Kentucky “shall not implement the academic content standards for English language arts and mathematics developed by the Common Core Standards Initiative and copyrighted by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers.” The bill also goes on to ban state participation in the Next Generation Science Standards Initiative and refuses any nationalized assessments related to the banned programs.

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State sovereignty resolution prefiled in Kentucky House

Kentucky Rep, Stan Lee (R – Lexington) has prefiled a Joint Resolution for the 2011 regular session reaffirming Kentucky’s sovereignty under the Ninth and Tenth Amendments.

The resolution, BR 55, “…serves as notice and demands to the federal government…to cease and desist, effective immediately, mandates that are beyond the scope of these constitutionally delegated powers.”

Lee said that the federal government needs do what it was intended to do and state government needs to do what it was intended to do.

“The health care debacle and failed stimulus bill are but two examples of the federal government’s attempt to cast a long shadow over Kentucky and our people, “ Lee said. “This joint resolution serves as a reminder to those who seek to make our federal government an eight-headed monster that we will no longer stand by and see our sovereign rights taken away.”

Lee introduced a similar resolution in the 2010 regular session, but it failed to pass.

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Candidates advocate for state and local control

Two Kentucky candidates recently made Tenth Amendment friendly statements.

While Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate Jack Conway continued to press the issue of rampant drug problems in Eastern Kentucky, saying his Republican opponent doesn’t get it and vocally advocating for federal funds, Rand Paul stuck to his guns, reiterating that he opposes federal funding for drug enforcement and addiction programs.

Paul insists the best way to deal with problems comes through innovating local solutions, adding that Washington siphoning money out of the state makes that more difficult.

“Right now we send money to Washington that comes back to us after it circulates through the Washington bureaucracy. Maybe if we weren’t sending so much to Washington, we’d have more in Kentucky,” Paul said.

Paul’s stand has apparently cost him some points in the polls. But Paul is right. And even if those dollars create some benefit when Washington deems it fit to bless the Commonwealth with a little windfall, the federal government has no Constitutional authority to fund drug programs.

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Federal funding – a powerful lever

The Commonwealth of Kentucky suffers from an addiction.

Over the years, the state has relied more and more heavily on federal money to plug budget holes. In 1985, federal funding made up 25 percent of the state’s revenues. In 2004, that figure had increased to 33 percent, according to the National Association of State Budget Officers. With more than $3 billion in federal stimulus money flowing into the Bluegrass State, the addict has plenty of cash to continue feeding its hunger.

Perhaps the time has come for an intervention.

We can talk about state sovereignty, states rights and nullification until we become blue in the face, but until state legislators make a concerted effort to pull the Commonwealth away from the federal feeding trough, the state will remain a slave to federal power. Washington can easily force Frankfort to acquiesce to its wills and whims, simply through the threat of withholding the addict’s drug – federal funds.

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