New Jersey Legislation Would Nullify Federal Hemp Ban

A bill introduced in the New Jersey State Assembly would legalize hemp farming and production, effectively nullifying a federal prohibition on the same.

A2719 was introduced on Feb. 24 by Rep. Reed Gusciora (D-15). The bill allows for a state-regulated market to develop in New Jersey that would essentially nullify the decades-long federal ban on industrial hemp within the state.

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New Jersey Action Alert: Support A1164 to Nullify Warrantless Drone Spying

A1164, a bill in the New Jersey assembly that would put severe restrictions on the use of drones by law enforcement within the state, was introduced by Assemblyman Jack Ciattarelli (R-16) on Jan. 16. It was promptly referred to the Homeland Security and State Preparedness Committee where it will need to pass by a majority before it receives a full vote in the assembly.

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Sovereignty for New Jersey?

Introduced by Assemblyman Gary Chiusano, Assemblywoman Alison Littell McHose and four co-sponsors, New Jersey’s Assembly Concurrent Resolution 23 (ACR23) seeks to claim “sovereignty under Tenth Amendment to United States Constitution over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted by Constitution to federal government.” If passed, the resolution would also make the position of the legislature…

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Sovereignty for New Jersey

There are now 38 states that have introduced resolutions to reaffirm the principles of delegated powers under the Constitution and the 10th Amendment.

The latest? New Jersey.

Under the radar until now, Assembly Concurrent Resolution 238 (ACR238) was actually introduced back on June 22, 2009. The resolution recognizes that:

“the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States provides: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” This concurrent resolution further recognizes that many federal mandates are in direct violation of the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Additionally, this resolution notes that in New York v. United States, 505 U.S. 144 (1992), the United States Supreme Court ruled that Congress may not simply commandeer the legislative and regulatory processes of the states. As such, this resolution claims sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted by the Constitution to the federal government and serves as notice and demand to the federal government to cease and desist mandates that are beyond the scope of these constitutionally delegated powers.”

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