Oklahoma Governor Vetoes Constitutional Carry Bill

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (May 14, 2018) – Late Friday, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed a so-called  “Constitutional Carry” bill that would have made it legal for most Oklahomans to carry a concealed firearm without a license. Passage into law would have also fostered an environment hostile to federal gun control.

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To the Governor: Oklahoma Passes Constitutional Carry Bill

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (May 2, 2018) – Yesterday, the Oklahoma Senate gave final approval to a so-called  “Constitutional Carry” bill that would make it legal for most Oklahomans to carry a concealed firearm without a license. Passage into law would also foster an environment hostile to federal gun control.

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Oklahoma Committee Passes Bill to Ban Warrantless Stingray Spying, Hinder Federal Surveillance

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (Feb 14, 2018) – Yesterday, an Oklahoma Senate committee unanimously passed a bill that would ban the warrantless collection of electronic data and the use of “stingrays” to track the location of phones and sweep up electronic communications in most situations. Passage of the bill would not only protect privacy in the Sooner State, it would also hinder one aspect of the federal surveillance state.

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Oklahoma Bill Would Allow Customers to Opt Out of Smart Meters, Undermine Federal Program

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (Jan. 31, 2018) – A bill introduced in the Oklahoma House would allow customers to opt out of installing “smart meter” technology on their homes and businesses without penalty. Passage of this bill would enable Oklahomans to protect their own privacy, and it would take a step toward blocking a federal program in effect.

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Oklahoma Bill Would Ban Warrantless Stingray Spying, Hinder Federal Surveillance

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (Jan. 30, 2018) – A bill prefiled in the Oklahoma Senate would ban the warrantless collection of electronic data and the use of “stingrays” to track the location of phones and sweep up electronic communications in most situations. Passage of the bill would not only protect privacy in the Sooner State, it would also hinder one aspect of the federal surveillance state.

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