The Principles of 98

A good introduction to the Principles of 98 from Keith Broaders at the California Tenth Amendment Center.  Here’s an excerpt: In 1798 when the Federalist Congress passed the Alien and Sedition Act, the Anti-Federalist led by Thomas Jefferson were outraged. The law passed by Congress made in a criminal offense for newspaper editors and onyone…

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American Thinker’s Curious Coverage of Nullification

J. Robert Smith writes A Curious Dalliance with Nullification at American Thinker today.  By using three citations from a single page in a single book, he determines that the idea of nullification is mistaken and that those of us who support nullification as a remedy to federal overreach are misguided.  Here are the the article…

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Nullification in a Nutshell

The “Principles of 98,” as they came to be known, are rarely discussed in modern history lectures even though these are integral to understanding how our federal Constitution was intended to function. These are the principles of state interposition or nullification that assert that if the federal government fails to check itself through one of…

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Do States Need Permission to Enforce their Rights?

The Tenth Amendment Center shared this WSJ Blog on Facebook recently. It was a pretty short piece that may be summed up in one paragraph. On its face, it certainly sounds like an amendment that’s worth being mindful of (which one isn’t?). Thing is, however, that any new application or enforcement of the 10th amendment…

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