Washington State Bill Would Ban “Material Support” for Warrantless Federal Spying Programs

OLYMPIA, Wash. (Jan. 11, 2018) – A bill introduced in the Washington state House would end state cooperation with warrantless federal spying. Passage of the legislation would not only help protect privacy in Washington, it would help hinder unconstitutional federal surveillance.

Details

Hemp Decriminalized in Washington, But Opposition Remains Strong

OLYMPIA, Wash. (May 5, 2017) – A bill recently signed by Washington Gov. Gov. Jay Inslee removed industrial hemp from the states controlled substance list, authorizing hemp production despite federal prohibition. But at least one state agency refuses to go down without a fight and essentially wants to help attorney general Jeff Sessions wage his war on cannabis.

Details

To the Governor: Washington Senate Passes Bill to Decriminalize Industrial Hemp

OLYMPIA, Wash. (April 12, 2017) – Today, the Washington Senate unanimously passed a bill that would remove industrial hemp from the state’s “controlled substances” list. If signed by the governor, the law would set the stage for people in the Evergreen State to nullify federal prohibition of the plant in practice.

Details

Washington Senate Committee Passes Bill to Decriminalize Industrial Hemp

OLYMPIA, Wash. (Mar. 22, 2017) – Today, a Washington Senate committee unanimously passed a bill that would remove industrial hemp from the state’s “controlled substances” list. Passage into law would set the stage for people in the Evergreen State to nullify federal prohibition on the plant in practice.

Details

Washington State Committee Passes Bill to Restrict ALPR Use; Help Block National License Plate Tracking Program

OLYMPIA, Wash. (Feb. 28, 2017) – A Washington state bill that would limit the use of automatic license plate readers (ALPRs), and restrict the retention and sharing of collected data, passed an important House committee last week. If given final approval, the bill would not only protect privacy in Washington state, but would also hinder some aspects of the federal surveillance state.

Details