“To what purpose are powers limited, and to what purpose is that limitation committed to writing, if those limits may, at any time, be passed by those intended to be restrained?”

- Chief Justice John Marshall

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bully-spotlight

Who’s the Bully?

A Texas football team recently beat an opponent 91-0 and the mother of one of the opposing players filed a bullying report with the school system.

According to ESPN.com, “Buchanan spent an hour in the superintendent’s office this week and the school is currently investigating, as mandated by the state. The Aledo principal told Buchanan that a written report is expected in the next day or so, something required by state law. Buchanan — who is in his 21st season as head coach at Aledo and said he has never been accused of bullying — said he has the support of the Aledo administration.”

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“The theory of our government is opposed to the deposit of unlimited power anywhere. The executive, the legislative, and the judicial branches of these governments are all of limited and defined powers.”

- Justice Samuel Miller

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“I did not want to be mistreated, I did not want to be deprived of a seat that I had paid for. It was just time… there was opportunity for me to take a stand to express the way I felt about being treated in that manner. I had not planned to get arrested. I had plenty to do without having to end up in jail. But when I had to face that decision, I didn’t hesitate to do so because I felt that we had endured that too long. The more we gave in, the more we complied with that kind of treatment, the more oppressive it became.” – Rosa Parks 1992 NPR interview

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“Each State then reserves its own rights to itself, and the [Virginia] Resolutions affirm, that the right to refuse obedience to an unconstitutional law, is among those reserved rights. Again: if the State may not act upon its own decision, until the majority have sanctioned it, the right so to decide, is, until the majority have sanctioned it, in that majority, and not in the State. The State has only the right to express its opinion; which opinion although involving her ‘safety,’ and her very existence, goes for nothing until approved by others.” – Abel P. Upshur

Some, such as Matt Spalding a the Heritage Foundation, argue only all of the states working together can legitimately nullify an unconstitutional act. The 19th century Virginia jurist obliterates that foolish notion. Nullification is a natural right of self-defense reserved to the states and the people.

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