From Drugs to Taxes, New Amendments Won’t Make a Difference

From talk show hosts to taxpayer defense organizations, a lot of people out there are justifiably sick over how our government is operating.  Many of them have proposed new Constitutional Amendments, either to reign in the power of the federal government, or to force it to exercise its constitutionally delegated powers and responsibilities.  It occurred to me while driving (I do a lot of thinking and praying behind the wheel), that the things these groups propose are why the Constitution was written in the first place – to define yet limit the powers of the federal government.

Congress, presidents past and present, and the Supreme Court have disregarded their Constitutional responsibilities and limitations on their authority for over a century.  If they fail to respect the Constitution and all the Amendments currently included in it, any proposed new Amendments, even if they got past 290 Representatives, 67 Senators and 38 state legislatures, will do nothing to restore one iota of our God-given freedoms.

In the year 1919, the 18th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified, which stated:

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Criminals Break the Law…So Let’s Pass More Laws?

Those of us who understand and value our unalienable, constitutionally-protected right to keep and bear arms often use this argument regarding gun control:

Gun “laws” don’t work because criminals don’t obey the law!

This seems like a logical argument since criminals, by the very definition of the word, ignore and break the law. Synonyms for criminal include lawbreaker, crook, offender and wrongdoer among others.

Of course we’re not saying that we don’t need laws, we’re just saying that additional laws won’t stop criminals – who by definition are already breaking the law – from breaking the law.

Many people agree with this line of thinking, but apparently only when it comes to gun control.

Example: Several members of the Ohio General Assembly – including some of the more liberty-minded members – support calling for an Article V convention for the purpose of passing an amendment to the Constitution. Ohio HJR 3 calls for an amendment which “shall provide that an increase in the federal debt requires approval from a majority of the legislatures of the separate states”.

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