How Do Local Mole Hills Become National Mountains?

People in general, but especially politicians, like to make MOUNTAINS out of a bunch molehills.  The key word is “bunch.”

Politicians use phrases like “Americans have the right to clean air and water”, “National Health Care” and “National Education System.” But are these really “national issues?” How do we know when an issue is “global,” “National,” state-wide or local?

Now please, don’t think I mean a molehill isn’t a problem or difficulty, and that many individual molehills couldn’t cause plenty of headaches.  They certainly can – and do. But the way we handle problems best, as any productivity guru would tell you, is one small item at a time.  Or in this case, one small, local mole hill at a time.

Washington DC doesn’t like small items because those items don’t justify a big “solution,” and I use the term solution loosely.  The reality is that Washington doesn’t solve national problems, it creates them. Then DC tells us there is just ONE OPTION – implement their “Big solution.” The feds sell the public through the piling of the millions of small molehills ever higher into one big mountain.  They hail from their ivory towers, “LOOK AT THIS MASSIVE MOUNTAIN, BUT FEAR NOT WE HAVE MASSIVE EARTH MOVING EQUIPMENT.”

At this point, people buy in to DC’s solution because the problem is just so big and complicated. And then it gets really awkward…seriously.  It’s awkward to use massive earth movers for backyard mole hills.  The breaking of the driveway as they back-up, the smashing of trees you planted with your kids, the clipping of your rain gutters, and the list goes on.

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