Companies Ask For NSA Transparency, DOJ Rejects Them

For there is nothing hidden that will not be disclosed, and nothing concealed that will not be known or brought out into the open. – Jesus Christ

The U.S. Department of Justice denied a request by tech companies Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, Facebook, and Linkedln to allow them to disclose more information about the frequency with which they are contacted by the U.S. government to give up user data under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. (More info here)

The DOJ claims that giving these companies the ability to tell the public more about requests from federal organizations like the NSA would pose a risk to national security.

Of course.

So, letting Americans know about its own government spying on them would set us up for real trouble huh? How about the threat to national security posed by the government itself? Shouldn’t the Constitution and transparency be more important? After all, you are four times more likely to be killed by a lightning bolt than by a terror attack.

Patrick Henry understood that government must remain transparent.

“The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them.”

Details

Would MLK support TAC?

On the 28th of August, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech.

With the anniversary shining the spotlight on King’s moving speech, those lovely statists, who love the idea of a unchecked federal leviathan, hit the blogs to argue that Dr. King would never have supported the idea of nullification. They cite two examples to back their claims.

The first comes from that very famous speech.

“I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.”

The second is MLK’s letter from a Birmingham jail.

“I have traveled the length and breadth of Alabama, Mississippi and all the other southern states. On sweltering summer days and crisp autumn mornings I have looked at the South’s beautiful churches with their lofty spires pointing heavenward. I have beheld the impressive outlines of her massive religious-education buildings. Over and over I have found myself asking: “What kind of people worship here? Who is their God? Where were their voices when the lips of Governor Barnett dripped with words of “interposition” and “nullification”? Where were they when Governor Wallace gave a clarion call for defiance and hatred? Where were their voices of support when bruised and weary Negro men and women decided to rise from the dark dungeons of complacency to the bright hills of creative protest?”

“Peterr” at firedoglake.com does a pretty good job of summing up these blog posts.

Details