US Conference of Mayors to Feds: Stop Interfering with State Marijuana Laws

The U.S. Conference of Mayors resolved last week to support “states setting their own marijuana policies without federal interference” and specifically called on President Obama to stand down on the crackdowns.

“The United States Conference of Mayors urges the President of the United States to reexamine the priorities of federal agencies to prevent the expenditure of resources on actions that undermine the duly enacted marijuana laws of states.”

The entire resolution is available HERE.

The resolution featured 18 cosponsors, including Seattle, Wash., Mayor Mike McGinn; Las Vegas, Nev., Mayor Carolyn Goodman; Oakland, Calif., Mayor Jean Quan and Alexandria, Va., Mayor William Euille.  Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker even supported the resolution. That’s worth noting, considering Utah isn’t exactly a haven for pot enthusiasts. Sales of any amount calls for five years incarceration plus a $5,000 fine under state law.

“The bipartisan resolution we passed today simply asks the federal government to give us time to implement these new policies properly and without interference. Cities and states across the country are enacting forward-thinking reforms to failed marijuana prohibition policies, and for the federal government to stand in the way is wasteful and contrary to the wishes of the American people,” Aurora, Colo., Mayor Steve Hogan said in a press release.

Details

Who Needs Due-Process Anyway?

The Japanese Internment Camps of World War II display the lengths to which American’s are willing to go in order to sacrifice liberty for safety.[1] Even though “two-thirds” of these Americans were native-born, the vast majority of the public saw no problem with locking them up (keeping in mind two-thirds of the Japanese’ in the camps were citizens) without just cause, without warrant, without any evidence of guilt, and with extreme prejudice. Fast forward sixty years and 9/11 happens and for the sake of a false sense of security, most Americans support the Patriot Act which like most legislation had to be passed in order to “find out what’s in it.”

Much to the chagrin of most American’s, there was a provision for indefinite detention of citizens in much the same circumstances as those faced by the Japanese-American’s during WWII. Most people reticently accepted the infringement of their civil liberties so that they would be “safer.” However, as time as passed there is a growing movement that realizes that this infringement is wrong and the threat of its use to be horrifying as they could be one of the one’s deemed an “enemy combatant”, moved to detention and left there to rot for the foreseeable future if not on a permanent basis.

Details

What Does Peggy Hill Have to Fear from the NSA?

I work nights.

On my “days” off, I used to switch to a daytime wake/sleep schedule in order to spend quality time with my family, but I no longer do.  In my old(er) age, I have discovered that the amount of time I render myself useless due to lack of sleep, plus the amount of time it takes me to get back into night-mode after a 3-day weekend is just too much to be worthwhile for anyone anymore.  Consequently, I spend a lot of time watching King of the Hill in the early morning hours while waiting until it is time to wake my daughter for school.

During a particularly funny re-run, I saw something that just happened to illustrate the problem with the NSA’s, and many American’s, reasoning, “if you’re not doing anything wrong, what’s your problem with us monitoring you?”

This episode of KOTH starts with Bobby (son) going camping with Hank (dad) and the guys for the weekend.  Peggy (mom) assures Hank that she will be fine alone – getting some housework done, and maybe working a crossword puzzles over the weekend.  But while the guys were out getting scouting badges, something happens that Peggy hopes Hank and Bobby never find out.

Details

Federalism is for Liberals

In a recent article in The Atlantic, Emily Bazelon makes the claim that “states’ rights are for liberals”, citing the examples of state support for marriage equality and the legalization of marijuana as examples.  Well, guess what, Emily.  You’re right!  States’ rights, or federalism, definitely is for liberals.

Of course, federalism is also for conservatives.  And libertarians.  And socialists. Federalism is really for anyone who doesn’t think that a group of central rulers are best-equipped to make decisions that affect the lives of 300 million people spread out over thousands of miles with differing priorities and values.

That the American left is realizing the value of federalism is a welcome change from the long-held misconception that a belief in decentralization was the exclusive calling card of conservatives (and for recognizing this we will even forgive Bazelon for continuing the left’s fascination with trying to link the principle of federalism with racial bigotry, which has been repeatedly refuted).

Details