James Monroe writes to Thomas Jefferson on State vs Federal Governments

Written May 4, 1801 The Writings of James Monroe. Edited by Stanislaus Murray Hamilton. 7 vols. New York and London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1898–1903. There is a subject to which I wish to engage yr. particular attention. Before I came into this office I was of opinion that the correspondence between the Executive of…

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Spinning Common Core, Again

The annual Education Next survey is out, and its headliner is the Common Core. Unfortunately, it features basically the same incomplete, answer-skewing question it employed last year, and reports the same dubious finding of majority support. But even with that, the direction in which opinion has moved speaks volumes about the serious trouble the Core is in.

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Video: Illegal Spying Below

This week, the Electronic Frontier Foundation released a video with a behind-the-scenes look at the coalition against NSA spying, and the recent publicity action over the data center in Bluffdale, Utah. Featured in the video was TAC founder, Michael Boldin. “They’re having a difficult time using it, and we know they need a lot of…

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Landslide Victory: First step to gun control nullification in Missouri

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., August 5, 2014 – In a landslide today, Missouri voters took a powerful first step towards a nullification of gun control measures by approving a constitutional amendment “obligating” the state to defend the right to keep and bear arms against all infringements.

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Thomas Jefferson, Opinion on the Constitutionality of the Bill for Establishing a National Bank

Hamilton justified the bank by broadly construing the constitutional powers of Congress. Jefferson, however, rejected Hamilton’s argument by claiming that the ratified Constitution created a federal government that was strictly limited in its political and financial power.

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Notes on the Commerce Clause: Madison at the 1787 Convention

CONVENTION OF 1787. Farrand, Max, ed. The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787.

The want of authy. in Congs. to regulate Commerce had produced in Foreign nations particularly G. B. a monopolizing policy injurious to the trade of the U. S. and destructive to their navigation; the imbecility and anticipated dissolution of the Confederacy extinguishg. all apprehensions of a Countervailing policy on the part of the U. States.

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