Supreme Court gets the Constitution right, for once

In an overwhelming 8-1 decision, the Supreme Court has ruled in favor of the odious Westboro Baptist Church and the First Amendment. That is, the amendment which protects ALL speech, not just politically-correct, state-approved speech. Bravo. The nine highest-paid federal judges in the land have proved themselves capable of comprehending the plain language of the Constitution. Why then,  we…

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Abandon Ship!

Nullification, state sovereignty and the Tenth Amendment have become all the rage over the past year, especially in Republican Party, right wing, Tea Party circles. So much so that most mainstream media reports frame the Tenther movement as an exclusively conservative/right wing phenomenon.

But in truth, many of these new-found disciples of the Tenth Amendment seem to view state sovereignty as simply an arrow in their quiver, a weapon effective in fighting legislation they disagree with. When the rubber meets the road, many of these ardent supporters of  “states’ rights” hop ship when the principle begins to clash with their political ideology.

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Virginia Blogger Calls Tenthers “Intellectual Boobs”

Dan Casey of the Roanoke Times recently embarrassed himself with a juvenile, ad hominem attack on the Tenth Amendment movement titled “The Whole Tenth Amendment Business is Dumb and Crazy.”

While it’s unclear whether Casey actually expected his “arguments” to be taken seriously, it is clear that he cannot make his point through the use of logic or fact. Therefore, Casey’s piece is chock full of historical inaccuracies, mis-characterizations and outright falsehoods regarding the original intent and meaning of the Constitution.

So many, actually, that I cannot list them all here. However, I did respond point by point in a piece of my own to be published soon.

Here is a sample:

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Consistently supporting liberty and the Tenth Amendment

One of the main obstacles to getting the “tenther” movement and the message of freedom to spread is that too many people claim they are for freedom on some issues (guns, taxes), but simultaneously claim to be anti-freedom on others (marijuana, gay-marriage).

Our two-party political system has raised people to believe that based on which party you subscribe to, you are supposed to advocate for either the federal government to get out of the way in regard to things that you like and to get in the way of people doing things that you don’t like. This is the essence of the problem. To truly embrace freedom and the tenth amendment movement, people need to start opposing federal involvement in EVERY area that is not authorized under the Constitution and not only in the activities which they personally disapprove.

For example, I know many republicans who constantly decry government interference in gun ownership and business, but practically BEG for it when it comes to banning gay marriage and drug use. The same goes for the other side; I know many democrats who say that government needs to get out of the way when it comes to marijuana and gays in the military, but they decry any attempt to lift the federal ban on abortion and/or repeal federal gun laws. It just doesn’t make any sense.

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A Fresh Perspective on the Tenther Movement

This fresh perspective on our Tenther movement comes from Mother Jones Magazine writer Stephanie Mencimer in this month’s issue.  Also- save the date!  CATAC’s first Nullify Now! event is now slated for April 20th, 2011 in Los Angeles. -B

If at First You Don’t Secede

Meet the legalization-loving, Iraq-War-hating Californian who’s become a guru to the state sovereignty movement.

By Stephanie Mencimer

17 CommentsPost CommentJuly/August 2010 Issue

This February, around 300 conservative activists and candidates gathered at the Atlanta airport Hilton to celebrate the Tenth Amendment, the oft-overlooked constitutional provision that’s become the philosophical underpinning of opposition to everything—from bank bailouts to federal gun laws to the new health care bill. Among the speakers were the author of The South Was Right; a man who’d done time for evading taxes while running a gold and silver “bank”; and Roy Moore, the former Alabama Supreme Court justice who lost his robes after refusing to remove a giant Ten Commandments from his courthouse.

The odd man out was Michael Boldin, the founder of the Tenth Amendment Center

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What’s Wrong with States’ Rights?

A good read from VT Campaign for Liberty: First there were “Truthers” and then “Birthers” and now there are “Tenthers.” To be accurate, the “Tenthers” actually came first, since this newly-coined term (which is supposed to denote a “fringe” position and is therefore derogatory) refers to those who believe the tenth amendment to the Constitution…

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