The Rightful Remedy

On Saturday, Sept. 25, Kentucky 10th Amendment Center chapter coordinator Mike Maharrey spoke at a freedom rally on the steps of the state capitol building in Frankfort. He discussed the Kentucky Resolution of 1798, emphasizing that states pushing back against overreaching federal power is not some radical or extremist idea, but the very remedy the…

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Nullification – What is that?

Thomas Jefferson, who most of us would call a creditable source, called Nullification the “rightful remedy” to the uncontrollable quest for government power.

In an oration in 1772, John Adams declared that, “Liberty, under every conceivable form of government is always in danger.” 26 years later, he personified that very danger when he signed into law the Alien and Sedition Acts, which made criticizing the president and others in the federal government a crime. Adams showed us that government is the greatest threat to liberty because it always tends toward the destruction of the individual’s natural rights.

In 1798 Thomas Jefferson along with James Madison, another creditable source, penned the Kentucky and Virginia resolutions in opposition to the Alien and Sedition Actc, which they felt violated the 1st Amendment rights of free speech and was therefore unconstitutional.  This was the first time that the term “Nullification” was used in political discourse.

Jefferson went on to say that any law that was unconstitutional, was in fact, no law at all!

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The Jeffersonian Position

From Thomas Jefferson: Writings (Library of America, 1984), pp. 1056–1057 is a January 26, 1799 letter from Jefferson to Edbridge Gerry (inventor of “gerrymandering”) explaining his political philosophy: “I do then, with sincere zeal, wish an inviolable preservation of our present federal constitution, according to the true sense in which it was adopted by the…

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Jefferson, the Fed, and the Tenth Amendment

In one of the many arguments Thomas Jefferson had with Alexander Hamilton in the first administration of the newly found republic, under President George Washington, Jefferson used these words to describe why Hamilton’s plan for a federal bank under private management was a bad and unconstitutional idea: “I consider the foundation of the Constitution as…

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Constitutionalists vs Conservatives

Critics who mock us as “tenthers” because we share views identical with Thomas Jefferson repeatedly make a fatal error. They believe that we are the same as the beltway, neoconservative, GOP-loyal rightwing. For instance, check out Alan Colmes attempt at “tenther-bashing.” His big finisher? Under our analysis, George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind is…

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